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Agricultural Market Information Services in Developing Countries: A Review

Isabella Rodriguez y Baena's picture
[News]

The paper "Agricultural Market Information Services in Developing Countries: A Review", by authors Mawazo M. Magesa, Kisangiri Michael and Jesuk Ko, has been published in the Journal "Advances in Computer Science: an International Journal" (ACSIJ), Vol. 3, Issue 3, No.9 , May 2014.

In this article the authors focus on smallholder farmers' ability to access to agricultural markets and marketing information, presenting a detailed analysis of the current status of agricultural market information services in developing countries, with a keen focus on sub-Saharan Africa; moreover, the authors present some of the reasons preventing the above-mentioned services to reach their full potential (e.g.: a limitation in using ICTs for disseminating market information in developing countries is that the "majority of small holder farmers rely more on word-of-mouth information from other farmers and traders").

 

 Title

Agricultural Market Information Services in Developing Countries: A Review

 Authors

Mawazo M. Magesa - School of Computational and Communications Science and Engineering, The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 447, Arusha, Tanzania
Kisangiri Michael - School of Computational and Communications Science and Engineering, The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 447, Arusha, Tanzania
Jesuk Ko - Department of Healthcare Management, Gwangju University, Gwangju 503–703, Korea

 Abstract

"Access to agricultural markets and marketing information are essential factors in promoting competitive markets and improving agricultural sector development. The agricultural sector employs majorities in developing countries and it contributes greatly to the development of these countries. Unluckily, majorities of the farmers are smallholders living in isolated rural areas and thus lack appropriate access to markets for their products and also they are deprived of agricultural market information. As a lack of these, smallholder farmers are exploited by greedy traders and receive low prices for their agricultural produce. This study has explored the use of agricultural market information services in linking smallholder farmers to markets, especially in sub-Sahara developing countries. Origin of, the needs for, and the current status of agricultural market information services in developing countries are clearly presented. Lastly, the study explored the limitation of the success of most agricultural market information services in sub-Sahara developing countries"

 

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